Conjuring Credits

The Origins of Wonder

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cards:bottom_slip_cut [2013/04/13 12:42]
denisbehr link added
cards:bottom_slip_cut [2014/02/14 07:00]
tylerwilson
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 ====== Bottom Slip Cut ====== ====== Bottom Slip Cut ======
  
-The concept of a bottom slip cut goes back to the early 18th century. ​In an Italian ​notebook ​known as the //Asti Manuscript// ​(c. 1700)the move is used in a trick with the translated title of "To have a card thought of and to send it, of various piles, into the one a person wants, and if it does not succeed, you have another pile cut, and at whatever place he cuts he finds his card." ​This manuscript was translated ​by Dr. Lori Pieper ​in the Winter, 2013 issue of //​Gibecière// ​(Vol. 8No1).+The concept of a bottom slip cut dates back to the early 18th century. ​It appears in an Italian ​manuscript ​known as the //Asti Manuscript//​c. 1700, p. 63 of the Pieper translation. This manuscript was translated in //​Gibecière//, ​Winter 2013, p29-234.
  
-The 20th century kicked the idea into gear, starting with "The Mystery of the Aces" by Charles Jordan in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​14625/​The+Four+Full+Hands/​28|Four Full Hands of Down to the Minute Magical Effects]]// ​(1922), and later in //The Tarbell ​System// (1926)titled "The '​Bottom'​ Card Control Clip cut".+The 20th century kicked the idea into gear, starting with "The Mystery of the Aces" by Charles Jordan in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​14625/​The+Four+Full+Hands/​28|Four Full Hands of Down to the Minute Magical Effects]]//1922, p. 5 of the 1947 edition, and later in //The Tarbell ​Course in Magic, Vol. 1//,  1941, p. 261.
  
-An application of the bottom slip cut, unfortunately without handling details, treated by Stanley Collins as common knowledge ​on p. 9 of his 1952 book //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​25508/​Stanley+Collins/​293?​gems|Gems of Personal Prestigitation]]//​ (not published until 2003 in //Stanley Collins: Conjurer, Collector, and Iconoclast//​ by Edwin A. Dawes). ​While oral tradition referred to this sleight being in use before ​Lorayne'​s HaLo cut (//​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​17951/​Rim+Shots/​135|Rim Shots]]//, 1973, p. 131), this is one of the first print references. Of course, the handling details may have differed, but there aren't that many practical approaches to this maneuver. Richard Kaufman ​writes that John Snyder developed the bottom slip cut, using a little-finger break and swing cut, in the 1940s. He gives no print reference for this. Kaufman also lays credit for the breakless handling at Derek Dingle'​s door (//​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​37328/​Genii/​72|Genii]]//,​ Vol. 67No. 5, May 2004, p. 72).+An application of the bottom slip cut, unfortunately without handling details, ​was treated by Stanley Collins as common knowledge ​in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​25508/​Stanley+Collins/​293?​gems|Gems of Personal Prestigitation]]//​, 1952, p. 9 (not published until //Stanley Collins: Conjurer, Collector, and Iconoclast//​, 2003, by Edwin A. Dawes). ​Harry Lorayne'​s ​commonly used HaLo cut appeared in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​17951/​Rim+Shots/​135|Rim Shots]]//, 1973, p. 131. Richard Kaufman lays credit for Lorayne'​s ​breakless handling at Derek Dingle'​s door; see //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​37328/​Genii/​72|Genii]]//,​ Vol. 67 No. 5, May 2004, p. 72.
  
 {{tag>​technique}} {{tag>​technique}}