Conjuring Credits

The Origins of Wonder

User Tools

Site Tools


Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
cards:oil_and_water [2015/09/02 22:12]
stephenminch added Professeur Magicus to Passez Muscade citation.
cards:oil_and_water [2017/06/28 14:57] (current)
Line 11: Line 11:
 In 1940, Walter B. Gibson published a one-phase color separation effect with a six-card packet: "Like Seeks Like" in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​12764/​Jinx+No+051+100/​233|The Jinx]]//, No. 91, May 1940, p. 569. Gibson used the Glide to cause the colors to separate. This has been cited as evidence that the effect is older than Marlo'​s "Oil and Water",​ but Marlo argued that important elements differentiate Gibson'​s effect from his: (1) an emphasized mixing procedure of the colors, (2) repetition of the effect and (3) the metaphor of oil and water to underline the effect. In 1940, Walter B. Gibson published a one-phase color separation effect with a six-card packet: "Like Seeks Like" in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​12764/​Jinx+No+051+100/​233|The Jinx]]//, No. 91, May 1940, p. 569. Gibson used the Glide to cause the colors to separate. This has been cited as evidence that the effect is older than Marlo'​s "Oil and Water",​ but Marlo argued that important elements differentiate Gibson'​s effect from his: (1) an emphasized mixing procedure of the colors, (2) repetition of the effect and (3) the metaphor of oil and water to underline the effect.
  
-An unusual red and black separation effect, "Les Seize Rouges et les Seize Noires",​ is an early relative of the Oil and Water plot. This appeared in the French conjuring journal //Passez Muscade//, No. 23, Sep 1924, p. 290, under the byline of "​Professeur Magicus"​. A deck is examined and shuffled by a spectator and set under the foot of a goblet. The goblet is covered. The spectator next chooses red or black, and all cards of this color are made to travel magically from the deck to the goblet above. The method involves the Mirror Glass principle, a box that switches decks and a prepared set of double-faced cards with red face on one side and a Deland-like two-card-spread gaff on the other side. When the pack is fanned with the gaffed two-card faces showing, it appears to be a full deck, but when the other side is fanned and displayed, only red cards are seen and they may be counted to prove there is only half a deck left.+An unusual red and black separation effect, "Les Seize Rouges et les Seize Noires",​ is an early relative of the Oil and Water plot. This appeared in the French conjuring journal //[[http://​www.conjuringcredits.com/​lib/​tpl/​credits/​files/​passez_muscade.pdf|Passez Muscade]]//, No. 23, Sep 1924, p. 290, under the byline of "​Professeur Magicus"​. A deck is examined and shuffled by a spectator and set under the foot of a goblet. The goblet is covered. The spectator next chooses red or black, and all cards of this color are made to travel magically from the deck to the goblet above. The method involves the Mirror Glass principle, a box that switches decks and a prepared set of double-faced cards with red faces on one side and a Deland-like two-card-spread gaff on the other side. When the pack is fanned with the gaffed two-card faces showing, it appears to be a full deck, but when the other side is fanned and displayed, only red cards are seen and they may be counted to prove there is only half a deck left.
  
 It has been pointed out that Samuel Pavloff contributed a Four Ace effect, "​What'​s Up?", to //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​38699/​Hugard+s+Magic+Monthly/​68|Hugard'​s Magic Monthly]]//,​ Vol. 6 No. 7, Dec. 1948, p. 494, in which, at one point he uses an oil-and-water metaphor with others conveying the idea of separation. That is the only similarity to Marlo'​s "Oil and Water"​. It has been pointed out that Samuel Pavloff contributed a Four Ace effect, "​What'​s Up?", to //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​38699/​Hugard+s+Magic+Monthly/​68|Hugard'​s Magic Monthly]]//,​ Vol. 6 No. 7, Dec. 1948, p. 494, in which, at one point he uses an oil-and-water metaphor with others conveying the idea of separation. That is the only similarity to Marlo'​s "Oil and Water"​.