Conjuring Credits

The Origins of Wonder

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cards:paintbrush_color_change [2017/06/28 14:57]
127.0.0.1 external edit
cards:paintbrush_color_change [2018/06/17 17:41]
tylerwilson Added a couple of references.
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 Two versions of this color-change principle are given in Glenn Gravatt'​s //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​17459/​Encyclopedia+of+Self+Working+Card+Tricks/​399|Encyclopedia of Self Working Card Tricks]]//, 1936, p. 393. Gravatt gives no attribution,​ but Jean Hugard, in his revision of Gravatt'​s book, repeats the second version and credits it to Jack Merlin (p. 341). These handlings involve a triple card, with cards preset face down and face up, which are drawn from the bottom of the deck as a single card and are brushed over the face-up top card to effect the transformation. Two versions of this color-change principle are given in Glenn Gravatt'​s //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​17459/​Encyclopedia+of+Self+Working+Card+Tricks/​399|Encyclopedia of Self Working Card Tricks]]//, 1936, p. 393. Gravatt gives no attribution,​ but Jean Hugard, in his revision of Gravatt'​s book, repeats the second version and credits it to Jack Merlin (p. 341). These handlings involve a triple card, with cards preset face down and face up, which are drawn from the bottom of the deck as a single card and are brushed over the face-up top card to effect the transformation.
  
-Dai Vernonin his "​Ambitious Card" routine from //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​18141/​Stars+of+Magic/​79|Stars of Magic]]//, Series 5 No. 2, 1949, p. 77 of the 1960 compilation book, uses what is essentially a reverse paintbrush changeThe effect is the same, but it is accomplished by pushing a single card forward, and pulling a double card back. And to add yet one more name to the list of people claiming ownership, Jeff Busby credits the move to Neal Elias in //Arcane//, No. 14, 1995, p. 203. Busby gives no citation for this attribution,​ but it's clear that it couldn'​t have been before Cloyes due to the timeframe involved.+An inverse technique, where instead of passing a double card over the deck and coming away with a single card, the performer passes a single card over the deck and comes away with a double card, was mentioned by Walter Gibson in //​[[https://​askalexander.org/​display/​38626/​The+Sphinx/​16|The Sphinx]]//, Vol. 17 No. 11, Jan. 1919, p. 216. Gibson claims that this method of stealing a card to effect the change is inferior to that of depositing a card to accomplish the same result. ​Dai Vernon ​used this inverse technique ​in his "​Ambitious Card" routine from //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​18141/​Stars+of+Magic/​79|Stars of Magic]]//, Series 5 No. 2, 1949, p. 77 of the 1960 compilation book. 
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 +To add yet one more name to the list of people claiming ownership, Jeff Busby credits the move to Neal Elias in //Arcane//, No. 14, 1995, p. 203. Busby gives no citation for this attribution,​ but it's clear that it couldn'​t have been before Cloyes due to the timeframe involved
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 +A related change was developed around the same time as Cloye'​s change. It, too, used a paintbrush action on the face of the deck, but the method to secretly accomplish the change was entirely different. It was published by M.F. Crowe as "The Artist Card" in //​[[https://​askalexander.org/​display/​38179/​The+Sphinx/​15|The Sphinx]]//, Vol. 9 No. 5, Oct. 1910, p. 175.
  
 {{tag>​technique}} {{tag>​technique}}