Conjuring Credits

The Origins of Wonder

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cards:photographic_coins [2018/10/02 06:47]
denisbehr formatting fix
cards:photographic_coins [2018/10/02 15:39]
stephenminch Added Linking Ring citation.
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 The effect of causing a miniature image of a selected (forced) card appear on a small piece of paper sandwiched between two large coins has become a well-worn classic. A clear predecessor is the "​Spirit Photography Card Trick"​. The trick as it is commonly done was originated in 1931 by Al Baker. A coin shell is cleverly used to switch the small piece of blank paper for another with a miniature card printed on it. However, Baker'​s main inspiration was a similar effect first marketed by A. W. Gamage. The effect of causing a miniature image of a selected (forced) card appear on a small piece of paper sandwiched between two large coins has become a well-worn classic. A clear predecessor is the "​Spirit Photography Card Trick"​. The trick as it is commonly done was originated in 1931 by Al Baker. A coin shell is cleverly used to switch the small piece of blank paper for another with a miniature card printed on it. However, Baker'​s main inspiration was a similar effect first marketed by A. W. Gamage.
  
-Al Baker first advertised his trick in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​38443/​The+Sphinx/​34|The Sphinx]]//, Vol. 30 No. 8, Oct. 1931, p. 384. Marketed through Baker'​s Broadway Magic Shop, "The Coin and Card Trick" ​came with the necessary coins, shell, miniature cards and [[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​10552/​Sid+Lorraine+Files+Folder+03+Al+Baker+General/​64|instruction sheet]]. In the last paragraph of the instructions,​ Baker acknowledges an earlier method. He writes:+Al Baker first advertised his trick as "The Coin and Card Trick" ​in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​38443/​The+Sphinx/​34|The Sphinx]]//, Vol. 30 No. 8, Oct. 1931, p. 384; and as "The Card and Two Coin Trick" in //​[[https://​askalexander.org/​display/​40640/​Linking+Ring/​57|The Linking Ring]]//, Vol. 11 No. 8, Oct. 1931, p. 847. Marketed through Baker and Sunshine's Broadway Magic Shop, the trick came with the necessary coins, shell, miniature cards and [[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​10552/​Sid+Lorraine+Files+Folder+03+Al+Baker+General/​64|instruction sheet]]. In the last paragraph of the instructions,​ Baker acknowledges an earlier method. He writes:
  
 "You will find the Al Baker method superior to the old fashioned way of having a point soldered to the face of shell coin. There is no point to bend or break or puncture holes in your cards in this up-to-date version."​ "You will find the Al Baker method superior to the old fashioned way of having a point soldered to the face of shell coin. There is no point to bend or break or puncture holes in your cards in this up-to-date version."​