Conjuring Credits

The Origins of Wonder

User Tools

Site Tools


Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
cards:torn-corner_dodge [2013/03/29 11:25]
denisbehr tag added
cards:torn-corner_dodge [2017/06/28 14:57] (current)
Line 1: Line 1:
 ====== Torn-Corner Dodge ====== ====== Torn-Corner Dodge ======
  
-Max Maven believes the earliest published instance of this method of confirming the identity of a torn and restored card is in Henri Decremps'​s //La magie blanche dévoilée// ​(1784English translation ​published the following year)Decremp ​claims to expose the methods (and hence the effects) of Pinetti, based on a performance observed in 1783. One of the routines explained ​is "The Card Nailed to the Wall by a Pistol Shot," which uses a version of the torn-corner identification. ​Further appearances of the idea in print occur in Hoffmann's //Modern Magic// ​(1876), Roterberg'​s //New Era Card Tricks// ​(1897) and Hilliar'​s //​Modern ​Magician'​s Handbook// (1902)The idea also crops up in early magazines; e.g., //Mahatma// (1895)//The Sphinx// (1904)//The Magician// (1906), //The Wizard// (1907), //​Stanyon'​s Magic //(1907). Published versions ​continue ​to appearwith increasing frequency, during the nineteen-teens. By the 1920s the idea had become standard ​and there are dozens of applications.+Max Maven believes the earliest published instance of this method of confirming the identity of a torn and restored card is in Henri Decremps'​s //La magie blanche dévoilée//​1784, p. 12 of the English translation. ​Decremps ​claims to expose the methods (and hence the effects) of Giovanni Giuseppe ​Pinetti, based on a performance observed in 1783. The routine references above is "The Card Nailed to the Wall by a Pistol Shot," which used a version of the torn-corner identification. 
 + 
 +That routine, along with the torn corner ​idea, was republished several times across many books throughout the nineteenth century. The concept began branching out in other tricks near the end of the century, with a torn and restored card in Professor Hoffman's //Modern Magic//1876, p. 98; August ​Roterberg'​s //New Era Card Tricks//, 1876, p. 75; William John Hilliar'​s //​Modern ​Magicians Hand Book//1902, p59; and a rising card in Hoffmann'​s ​//Drawing Room Conjuring//, 1887p. 42. Published versions ​continued ​to appear with increasing frequency, during the early 1900s. By the 1920sthe idea had become standard, with dozens of applications.
  
 {{tag>​principle}} {{tag>​principle}}