Conjuring Credits

The Origins of Wonder

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coin:coin_boxes [2019/06/23 19:42]
stephenminch Added Slot Coin Box crossreference.
coin:coin_boxes [2019/06/24 07:58] (current)
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 ====== Coin Boxes ====== ====== Coin Boxes ======
  
-Perhaps the earliest coin box on record---with the exception of the Rattle Box, which was used to vanish not just coins but also finger rings and other small objects---was an elaborately gimmicked, round, lidded metal box conceived to vanish a stack of coins placed into it. The box consisted of a bottomless ring, a knobbed lid and two removable bottoms. One bottom fit loosely, the other wedged tightly. The lid concealed a shallow insert, containing a single coin. This insert, when released by the lid onto the box, sat on top and made the box look like it was full of coins. The lid could also pick up this insert to reveal the box empty. This coin box is known to have been used by J. N. Hofzinser, almost certainly prior to 1850. It is uncertain if the box was his invention or older. As much of the working as is known is described by Ottokar Fischer in //​[[https://​askalexander.org/​display/​14886/​Zauberk+nste/​57|Hofzinsers Zauberk√ľnste]]//,​ 1942, p. 41. (Also see Richard Hatch'​s English translation,​ //​[[https://​askalexander.org/​display/​25317/​The+Magic+of+Johann+Nepomuk+Hofzinser/​55|The Magic of Johann Nepomuk Hofzinser]]//,​ 1985, p. 53.+Perhaps the earliest coin box on record---with the exception of the Rattle Box, which was used to vanish not just coins but also finger rings and other small objects---was an elaborately gimmicked, round, lidded metal box conceived to vanish a stack of coins placed into it. The box consisted of a bottomless ring, a knobbed lid and two removable bottoms. One bottom fit loosely, the other wedged tightly. The lid concealed a shallow insert, containing a single coin. This insert, when released by the lid onto the box, sat on top and made the box look like it was full of coins. The lid could also pick up this insert to reveal the box empty. This coin box is known to have been used by J. N. Hofzinser, almost certainly prior to 1850. It is uncertain if the box was his invention or older. As much of the working as is known is described by Ottokar Fischer in //​[[https://​askalexander.org/​display/​14886/​Zauberk+nste/​57|Hofzinsers Zauberk√ľnste]]//,​ 1942, p. 41. (Also see Richard Hatch'​s English translation,​ //​[[https://​askalexander.org/​display/​25317/​The+Magic+of+Johann+Nepomuk+Hofzinser/​55|The Magic of Johann Nepomuk Hofzinser]]//,​ 1985, p. 53.)
  
-Another early coin box that performed the same task in a far less complicated way was the lidless German Coin Box, which was described under the title of "Der Changier-Cylinder"​ in the May 1896 issue of //Der Zauberspiegel//,​ Vol. 1 No. 9, p. 138. The box has a shallow recess in the bottom, into which a coin neatly fits. When the box is secretly turned bottom up, the coin in the recess makes the box appear full of coins. The anonymous article (probably written by Friedrich W. Conradi-Horster,​ the publisher) in //Der Zauerspiegel//​ gives no indication of the origin of the box. It is probably some years older than than 1896, as by 1913 it was being referred to as "a very old principle"​.+Another early coin box that performed the same task in a far less complicated way was the lidless German Coin Box, which was described under the title of "Der Changier-Cylinder"​ in the May 1896 issue of //[[http://​www.conjuringcredits.com/​lib/​tpl/​credits/​files/​1896-zauberspiegel.png|Der Zauberspiegel]]//, Vol. 1 No. 9, p. 138. The box has a shallow recess in the bottom, into which a coin neatly fits. When the box is secretly turned bottom up, the coin in the recess makes the box appear full of coins. The anonymous article (probably written by Friedrich W. Conradi-Horster,​ the publisher) in //Der Zauerspiegel//​ gives no indication of the origin of the box. It is probably some years older than than 1896, as by 1913 it was being referred to as "a very old principle"​.
  
 Sometime after the lidded Okito box became popular (see below), someone added a lid to the German Coin Box. This became known as the Boston Box. Attributions to George Boston and Dr. Arnold Boston are erroneous. Sometime after the lidded Okito box became popular (see below), someone added a lid to the German Coin Box. This became known as the Boston Box. Attributions to George Boston and Dr. Arnold Boston are erroneous.