Conjuring Credits

The Origins of Wonder

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coin:slot_machine_plot [2017/06/28 14:57]
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coin:slot_machine_plot [2017/08/01 07:34] (current)
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 While Dr. Sawa's coin production using the plot of a human slot-machine (//​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​37003/​Genii/​23|Genii]]//,​ Vol. 41 No. 1, Jan. 1977, p. 23) is the best-known use of this presentational gimmick, the plot was first used by L. L. Ireland (apparently accompanying a marketed item called "The Fifty Cent Trick",​ which came with a penny holder). The Ireland trick is described in the final paragraph of Paul Studham'​s "The Human Slot Machine"​ in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​13889/​Bull+s+Eye+Coin+Tricks/​28|Bull'​s-Eye Coin Tricks]]// by L. L. Ireland and Ed Marlo, 1942, p. 24. In the Ireland trick, the performer uses a spectator as a slot machine, dropping a coin into his breast pocket, pulling down his arm and then producing a handful of pennies from under his vest, stolen from a coin holder. The Studham trick reversed the roles: Someone dropped a coin into the performer'​s breast pocket and pulled down his arm, upon which the performer pulled a drink from under his own vest. Hans Trixer later published an effect using the presentational idea in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​7650/​Gen+Vol+08/​229|The Gen]]//: "Slot Machine Trick",​ Vol. 8 No. 8, Dec. 1952, p. 235. This is a bit closer to Sawa's effect. Two coins are apparently inserted into the performer'​s fist and changed into a miniature bottle of Coke or liquor. While presented as a slot machine, this seems more like a vending machine. While Dr. Sawa's coin production using the plot of a human slot-machine (//​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​37003/​Genii/​23|Genii]]//,​ Vol. 41 No. 1, Jan. 1977, p. 23) is the best-known use of this presentational gimmick, the plot was first used by L. L. Ireland (apparently accompanying a marketed item called "The Fifty Cent Trick",​ which came with a penny holder). The Ireland trick is described in the final paragraph of Paul Studham'​s "The Human Slot Machine"​ in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​13889/​Bull+s+Eye+Coin+Tricks/​28|Bull'​s-Eye Coin Tricks]]// by L. L. Ireland and Ed Marlo, 1942, p. 24. In the Ireland trick, the performer uses a spectator as a slot machine, dropping a coin into his breast pocket, pulling down his arm and then producing a handful of pennies from under his vest, stolen from a coin holder. The Studham trick reversed the roles: Someone dropped a coin into the performer'​s breast pocket and pulled down his arm, upon which the performer pulled a drink from under his own vest. Hans Trixer later published an effect using the presentational idea in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​7650/​Gen+Vol+08/​229|The Gen]]//: "Slot Machine Trick",​ Vol. 8 No. 8, Dec. 1952, p. 235. This is a bit closer to Sawa's effect. Two coins are apparently inserted into the performer'​s fist and changed into a miniature bottle of Coke or liquor. While presented as a slot machine, this seems more like a vending machine.
  
-  * [[http://​www.conjuringarchive.com/​show.php?​cat=1547|Category in Denis Behr's "​Conjuring Archive"​]]+  * [[http://​www.conjuringarchive.com/​list/​category/​1547|Category in Denis Behr's "​Conjuring Archive"​]]
  
 {{tag>​presentation effect}} {{tag>​presentation effect}}