Conjuring Credits

The Origins of Wonder

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mental:blindfold_drive [2016/05/16 07:00]
denisbehr Page moved from mentalism:blindfold_drive to mental:blindfold_drive
mental:blindfold_drive [2016/06/17 02:04]
tylerwilson General OCDing.
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 ======Blindfold Drive====== ======Blindfold Drive======
  
-Washington Irving Bishop was the first to drive a vehicle through public streets while blindfolded. He drove a horse-drawn carriage through the streets of Boston on November 20, 1886. The feat was reported in the November 21, 1886 issue of the New York newspaper //​[[http://​chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/​lccn/​sn83030272/​1886-11-21/​ed-1/​seq-10/#​date1=1836&​sort=date&​date2=1922&​searchType=advanced&​language=&​sequence=0&​index=19&​words=BISHOPS+blindfolded+IRVING&​proxdistance=5&​rows=20&​ortext=&​proxtext=&​phrasetext=irving+bishop&​andtext=blindfold&​dateFilterType=yearRange&​page=1|The Sun]]//. Bishop performed the stunt in the context of finding a small article that a committee had hidden somewhere in the city. Subsequent performers in the early twentieth century adapted this publicity stunt to automobiles and dropped the location of a hidden object, making the effect one purely of eyeless vision.+Washington Irving Bishop was the first to drive a vehicle through public streets while blindfolded. He drove a horse-drawn carriage through the streets of Boston on November 20, 1886. The feat was reported in the November 21, 1886 issue of the New York newspaper //​[[http://​chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/​lccn/​sn83030272/​1886-11-21/​ed-1/​seq-10/#​date1=1836&​sort=date&​date2=1922&​searchType=advanced&​language=&​sequence=0&​index=19&​words=BISHOPS+blindfolded+IRVING&​proxdistance=5&​rows=20&​ortext=&​proxtext=&​phrasetext=irving+bishop&​andtext=blindfold&​dateFilterType=yearRange&​page=1|The Sun]]//, p. 10. Bishop performed the stunt in the context of finding a small article that a committee had hidden somewhere in the city. Subsequent performers in the early twentieth century adapted this publicity stunt to automobiles and dropped the location of a hidden object, making the effect one purely of eyeless vision.
  
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