Conjuring Credits

The Origins of Wonder

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mental:divination_through_magnetism [2015/05/16 16:39]
stephenminch Cancel that corrected date - 2nd ed.
mental:divination_through_magnetism [2017/06/28 14:58]
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-====== Divination through Magnetism ====== 
  
-The earliest recorded use of magnetism as a method for a divination effect is probably "Les trois nombres magiques",​ which appears in the second edition of volume one of Guyot'​s //Nouvelles recreations physiques et mathematiques//,​ published in 1772. A set of numbered wooden blocks is arranged and hidden in a wooden box by a spectator. The order is determined by the performer, who does not touch the box but observes it by looking through a small telescope. The telescope contains a compass, which points in four different directions depending on which numbered block it is near. 
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-Much the same effect, with a more elaborate method that also uses magnetism, is "The Box of Divination"​ in volume two of //​Hooper'​s Rational Recreations//,​ published in 1774. 
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-By the end of the nineteenth century, the trick (in streamlined form) is well established. A version appears as "The Box of Numbers"​ in Hoffmann'​s //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​18823/​More+Magic/​271|More Magic]]//, 1890. In this, the pieces are defined as "​slabs"​ (hence closer to thick cards or tablets rather than cubes). The same effect is recycled in Hilliar'​s //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​18955/​Modern+Magicians+Hand+Book/​224?​pw=magnet|Modern Magician'​s Hand Book]]//, 1902. 
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-In the January 1899 issue of //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​16166/​Mahatma+Vol+2+No+07/​10|Mahatma]]//,​ Henry Hardin has "A Clever Improvement"​ with the introductory comment: "The box of numbers trick, with the magnets and compasses, will be remembered by all who are to any degree proficient in legerdemain...."​ (Hardin'​s trick does not use magnets.) 
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-Actual playing cards show up in "​Mysterious Card Trick" as an item in Pierce'​s //Magic World// magazine, in the monthly "Home Made Magic" column written pseudonymously by "Thumb Print" (identity unknown), in the December 1922 issue. 
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-The commonness of the basic trick is evidenced by it being the first item in the first installment of Dunninger'​s "Magic For Everybody"​ series in //Science & Invention//,​ a magazine for the public. This is a simplified version, described for the lay reader. Titled "The Blocks of the Yogi", it uses plaques that are much closer to cards than cubes. 
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-A significant departure from blocks or plaques (but rather coins and envelopes) was devised in 1935 by Stewart James. He performed this at that year's Abbott'​s Get-Together and won the Originality Contest. Later that year, he marketed it as "​Numismatigic"​ and a year later, having apparently sold few if any, gave it to Annemann who published it in //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​15714/​Jinx+No+025/​5|The Jinx]]//, No. 25, that October. 
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-"The Wooden Block Divination Trick" appears in Hilliard'​s //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​13140/​Greater+Magic/​884|Greater Magic]]// in 1938, along with a variation using colored candles. An untitled "​slab"​ version leads off the section on divination in Henry Hay's //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​18498/​Cyclopedia+of+Magic/​184|Cyclopedia of Magic]]//, 1949. 
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-In 1958, Dr. Jaks released "​Mental Touch",​ which used shimmed cards. In the same year, Corinda published the first installment of //​[[http://​askalexander.org/​display/​22640/​13+Steps+to+Mentalism+Step+One+Swami+Gimmick/​144|13 Steps to Mentalism]]//,​ which includes Punx's "The Magnetic Blindfold"​ that incorporates shimmed cards as well. 
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-(Max Maven.) 
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-{{tag>​principle}}