Conjuring Credits

The Origins of Wonder

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paper:out_to_lunch [2015/12/17 02:43]
stephenminch
paper:out_to_lunch [2015/12/19 11:57]
denisbehr link updated
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 This principle was used as far back as the 17th century, appearing in two anonymous, unpublished manuscripts: //[[http://askalexander.org/display/30886/Gibeci+re/160|Sloane 424]]//, c. 1600s, p. 160 of the Pieper translation; and the //[[http://askalexander.org/display/38803/Gibeci+re/59|Asti Manuscript]]//, c. 1700, p. 58. These manuscripts were translated in //Gibecière//, Vol. 5 No. 2, Summer 2010, p. 141-172, and //Gibecière//, Vol. 8 No. 1, Winter 2013, p. 29-234, respectively. These methods didn't use a rubber band; instead, they used a card folded in half, and a finger or thumb across the pack to cover the seam. This principle was used as far back as the 17th century, appearing in two anonymous, unpublished manuscripts: //[[http://askalexander.org/display/30886/Gibeci+re/160|Sloane 424]]//, c. 1600s, p. 160 of the Pieper translation; and the //[[http://askalexander.org/display/38803/Gibeci+re/59|Asti Manuscript]]//, c. 1700, p. 58. These manuscripts were translated in //Gibecière//, Vol. 5 No. 2, Summer 2010, p. 141-172, and //Gibecière//, Vol. 8 No. 1, Winter 2013, p. 29-234, respectively. These methods didn't use a rubber band; instead, they used a card folded in half, and a finger or thumb across the pack to cover the seam.
  
-The idea didn't hit the printed page until the mid-nineteenth century. It appeared with a half-card in the trick "Hold it Fast" in anonymously authored //[[http://askalexander.org/display/12501/Parlour+magic+electronic+resource/227-228|Parlour Magic]]//, 1838, p. 157 (link is to 3rd ed., p. 203). Later, it was included in R.P's //Ein Spiel Karten//, 1853, p. 22 of the Pieper translation.+The idea didn't hit the printed page until the mid-nineteenth century. It appeared with a half-card in the trick "Hold it Fast" in anonymously authored //[[http://www.conjuringcredits.com/lib/tpl/credits/files/1838_parlour_magic_157.pdf|Parlour Magic]]//, 1838, p. 157. Later, it was included in R.P's //Ein Spiel Karten//, 1853, p. 22 of the Pieper translation.
  
 During the latter half of the 19th century, the idea was applied to slate writing. (See, for example, "The Interrupted Flap" in William Robinson's //Spirit Slate Writing and Kindred Phenomena//, 1898, p.47.) During the latter half of the 19th century, the idea was applied to slate writing. (See, for example, "The Interrupted Flap" in William Robinson's //Spirit Slate Writing and Kindred Phenomena//, 1898, p.47.)